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Understanding Stability and Change in the Gender Segregated Labour Market

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Norway is a country with a high female labour market participation. Still, women and men work – to a large extent – in different parts of the labour market. This is often referred to as the “gender equality paradox”.  Women continue to concentrate in the health and care sector, while men largely still dominate in technological and manual occupations. Today, girls are outperforming boys in the educational system, yet men still bypass women in the labour market in terms of career development and income. The conference aims to address these apparently contradictory tendencies.

This is the concluding conference for the project Gender segregation in the labor market: Comparative perspectives and welfare state challenges, financed by the Research Council of Norway. The event is organized in collaboration with CORE – Centre for Research on Gender Equality.

We ask:

  • How can we understand the coexistence of stability and change in the gender segregated labour market?
  • What is the role of gender for how young boys and girls think about educational choices?
  • How can we understand gender differences in career development over the life course?

To discuss these questions we have invited two distinguished international scholars and leading experts. We are delighted to announce the conference keynote speakers:

  • Manly Sciences? Gender Segregation of STEM and What to Do About It, by Professor Maria Charles, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Constructing Masculine Brilliance in Academic STEM: Evaluations, Introductions, and Interruptions of Faculty Candidate Finalists, by Professor Mary Blair-Loy, University of California, San Diego

Lunch will be served from 11:30

The research project Gender Segregation in the Labour Market: Comparative Perspectives and Welfare State Challenges has been carried out at the Institute for Social Research in collaboration with the University of Oslo, Boston University, Wellesley College, UC San Diego and the University of Basel with financial support from the Research Council of Norway’s program for welfare, working life and migration.

Publisert 21. juni 2019 14:41 - Sist endret 25. okt. 2019 13:14